Fiber Optic Ocean
Data Driven Interactive Sound and Light Installation

 

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Fiber Optic Ocean is a data driven interactive installation that composes music. This installation creates unique musical scores dependent on live data. Fiber Optic Ocean conveys the consequences of technology's invasion of oceans.

Fiber Optic Ocean is a data driven interactive installation that composes music. This installation creates unique musical scores dependent on live data. Fiber Optic Ocean conveys the consequences of technology's invasion of oceans.

The piece procedurally composes music made with trombone and choral voices generated by live data coming from the live sharks and human use of internet. The group of fiber optic cables going through the sharks blink at a rate based on speed of live sharks tracked with GPS data. Fiber optic threads composing the ocean blink based on the speed of the internet, symbolized with the number of tweets per second.

Human beings’ selfish invasion of nature expands to the depth of oceans. Underwater surveillance cameras are revealing that sharks are drawn to fiber optic cables and biting down on them. One theory is that the magnetic field around the fiber optic cables is stimulating the receptors in sharks’ mouths and luring them to perceive the cables as prey.

The current struggle between sharks and technology corporations is a pristine symbol of the ongoing conflict between nature and culture. The two sides clash nose to nose on a thin fiber optic line.

CREDITS

Fiber Optic Ocean 
An Interactive Installation by Ozge Samanci, 2015

Data Visualization, Sound Design, Coding: Adam Snyder
3D Modeling, 3D Printing, and Installation Assistance: Michael Villa
DMX Hardware Solutions: Chaz Evans
Installation Assistance: Lilian Glynis Smith
Shark Bones Research Resource: The Field Museum, Caleb McMahan
Documentation Video: Deborah Libby
Time lapse photography: Code Snippets: Adam Snyder 
Shark tracking: Ocearch.org
Underwater shark footage: @talan3 on Youtube
Illumination Materials: Minar Illumination, China
3D Printing: Shapeways
Mold Making Materials: Smooth-On

Thanks
Noa Younse, Jennifer V. Schmidt, Eric Patrick, Mimi White, Rick Morris, Shirley Adams

 
Demo Video